Fish Governance and Trade

Fish is one of the leading export commodities for Africa, with an annual export value of 14 billion USD. However, the capacity of many African coastal nations to utilise their coastal and marine assets, while simultaneously protecting them from degradation and exploitation, is lacking. The full economic and social benefits of the fish trade have yet to reach its full potential. Without an adequate governance structure, fisheries and the fish trade will not be adequately safeguarded for the benefit of future generations. The effects of climate change which may modify the habitats, distribution and productivity of marine species is a factor that is becoming of increasing importance. The NEPAD Agency’s two Fisheries Governance and Trade Programmes work to encourage African countries to consider and implement policies and governance reforms aimed at improving the productivity, profitability and sustainability of Africa's fisheries and the welfare benefits provided by this sector.
DID YOU KNOW?
From the combination of heavy fishing pressure by artisanal fleets and by foreign industrial fishing vessels, some of them practicing Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing, many fish stocks are highly and/or over exploited. West Africa alone is losing 1.3 billion USD due to IUU per year.

Fish is one of the leading export commodities for Africa, with an annual export value of 14 billion USD. However, the capacity of many African coastal nations to utilise their coastal and marine assets, while simultaneously protecting them from degradation and exploitation, is lacking. The full economic and social benefits of the fish trade have yet to reach its full potential. Without an adequate governance structure, fisheries and the fish trade will not be adequately safeguarded for the benefit of future generations. The effects of climate change which may modify the habitats, distribution and productivity of marine species is a factor that is becoming of increasing importance.

The NEPAD Agency’s two Fisheries Governance and Trade Programmes work to encourage African countries to consider and implement policies and governance reforms aimed at improving the productivity, profitability and sustainability of Africa's fisheries and the welfare benefits provided by this sector.

Key interventions of the programmes are geared at addressing:

  1. Weak Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) resulting in illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing
  2. Low returns from the exploitation of fish resources
  3. Weak and uncoordinated institutions governing the sector
  4. Lack of knowledge and evidence to foster reforms
  5. Untapped potential of small scale fisheries
  6. Undeveloped aquaculture sector in view of the increasing demand for fish products and declining fish stocks in capture fisheries in marine and inland waters on the continent
Results:

Through the establishment of Fisheries and Aquaculture Programme, fisheries was mainstreamed into continental agenda with the following results:

 

  • The adoption of the Pan-African Fisheries Policy Framework and Reform Strategy in June 2014 in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea by the Heads of State and Government of Africa. 
  • The establishment of the Conference of Africa Ministers in Charge of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CAMFA) as a continental policy organ CAMFA I (Banjul 2010). 
  • Establishment of CAMFA as a Secretariat anchored at AU-IBAR (CAMFA II-Malabo 2014) since Malabo.
  •   Fisheries and Aquaculture Programme working groups have been established as African Union Fisheries working Group to support the fisheries reform process (CAMFA II).
  •   “Fisheries” is set as a priority investment area in more than 20 Member States CAADP Compacts.

 

Others

Implementing the Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa

Fish resource exploitation provides a wide variety of benefits to Africans. However, these benefits are currently threatened by the increasing overexploitation of fish resources.

This overexploitation is being driven by the intrinsic wealth of Africa’s fish resources. Yet, this same...

Policy Briefs

Market-based economies are strengthening throughout Africa and development goals are taking account of this through a focus on harnessing the value chains to meet market demands.

Commercial aquaculture has a clear role in value chains for fish/seafood with potential attributes of...

Every couple of years or so, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations publishes the State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA). An important part of these reports is to give an overview of the current situation on marine capture fish stocks. In 1974, 50%...

The low chance of detection of illegal activity has fuelled a thriving market in illegal fishery products; at least one out of every four fish caught in Africa is caught illegally.

Only through its eradication can countries enjoy the full benefits available from their fishery...

In Africa, the Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) sector accounts for over 90% of all enterprises of which between 70 to 80% are micro and very small enterprises, while medium enterprises account for between 5 to15%. They provide the main source of jobs and income for Africans....

The Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) aims to attain an average annual growth rate of 6% in agriculture.

Fish resource exploitation already contributes to this objective. Together fisheries and aquaculture currently contribute about 1.4% of African...

To provide countries with the necessary framework and methodology, a “Pan-African Strategy on improvement of fisheries and aquaculture data collection, analyses and dissemination“ has been developed collaboratively by the NEPAD Agency and the Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources...

Africa possesses important natural capital in the form of its fish and aquatic resources. In order to realize its full potential, reform is required in the overall policy and governance framework with practical implementation of this reform at the fishery level.

African States...

As fish stocks decline and the demand for fish and seafood increases, illegal fishing and the trade of illegal fish is an attractive option for some operators. The main reason for this in commercial fisheries is to minimize operating costs in order to increase profits.

...

African fisheries and aquaculture and the people dependent on the sector – especially those already marginalized – are amongst the most vulnerable to climate change and disaster impacts.

Serious economic, social and environmental costs already occur and more are predicted and will...

Fish is an important part of the African diet, and in several countries it is the main source of animal protein.

Fish is a source of micronutrients and essential fatty acids which are not found in other types of food.  However, supply of fish has difficulties to keep path with...

Although gender has been on the international development agenda for a long time, many inequalities remain and the role of women in fisheries and aquaculture is often not documented and hence undervalued.

While consideration of age is important in gender analysis, youth also...

The NEPAD Agency Fisheries and Aquaculture Programme was established in 2009 with the objective of maximising the contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food and nutrition security in Africa. This objective corresponds with the framework of Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development...

Despite the importance of fish and fishery products for protein supply of the African people, trade in these products at intra-regional level are not well documented; and hence, not well known.

Intra-African fish trade accounts for slightly more than 10% or USD 430 million of total...

Policy Report

Africa accommodates 14% of the world’s population, yet it only produces 5% of total and 2% of farmed fish.

The continent imports three million tonnes of fish annually worth USD 3 billion as it does not produce enough to satisfy its own internal markets. However, the continent...

The framework is structured around three main entities: a set of guiding and cross-cutting principles, seven main policy areas, objectives, and strategies against each of the objectives. The Policy Framework lays down the guiding principles for effecting appropriate reforms whilst the Reform...

Drawing on the results of pilot studies on post-harvest fisheries losses in the riparian countries of the Volta Basin, was this post-harvest loss strategy document compiled. National results from Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mali and Togo are presented, from which lessons on how to...

The provisions of the Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa (PFRS) incorporate best practices for sustainable fisheries management and responsible aquaculture development which have been identified as priorities by stakeholders. The rational implementation...

04 July 2016
The NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency has the honour of announcing that President Conde has been designated “Political Champion” for Fisheries and Aquaculture in its Natural Resources Governance...
13 April 2016
The African Union (AU) has declared support for an inclusive agricultural plan that seeks to transform the sector for increased growth to create wealth, improve livelihoods and eradicate poverty. ...
13 April 2016
NEPAD CEO, Dr. Ibrahim Assane Mayaki has challenged African leaders to evolve innovative and pragmatic strategy that will help deal with the emerging trends and challenges of the agriculture sector.
New fisheries reforms will boost fish trade volumes in Guinea through the support of the NEPAD Agency. This was the outcome of a recent meeting between President of Guinea, Alpha Condé, and NEPAD...
  • 26 Jun 2017

    The first international conference and exposition of the World Aquaculture Society (WAS) will convene on the African Continent at the end of this month. The event will attract wide sponsorship and support from African development institutions including the African Union (the NEPAD Agency and AU-...

Contact:

Email: BettyA@nepad.org

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