Southern African Network for Biosciences (SANBio)

The Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SANBio) is a shared biosciences research, development and innovation platform for working collaboratively to address some of Southern Africa's key biosciences issues in health, nutrition and health-related intervention areas such as agriculture and environment.

The Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SANBio) was established in 2005 under the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), as one of the five networks established under the African Biosciences Initiative (ABI), to cover the SADC region. The platform provides access to world-class laboratories for African and international scientists conducting research on African biosciences challenges. SANBio’s work focuses on four areas, namely agriculture, health, nutrition and livestock.

DID YOU KNOW?
The SANBio network covers 13 countries: Angola, Botswana, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Lesotho, Swaziland, Seychelles, Madagascar, Republic of South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Network operations are facilitated by a Secretariat, located at and supported by the Hub (the CSIR) on behalf of all the stakeholders.

The Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SANBio) is a shared biosciences research, development and innovation platform for working collaboratively to address some of Southern Africa's key biosciences issues in health, nutrition and health-related intervention areas such as agriculture and environment.

The Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SANBio) was established in 2005 under the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), as one of the five networks established under the African Biosciences Initiative (ABI), to cover the SADC region. The platform provides access to world-class laboratories for African and international scientists conducting research on African biosciences challenges. SANBio’s work focuses on four areas, namely agriculture, health, nutrition and livestock.

Results:

Capacity Building: 

  • The IKS node in partnership with the EU, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), NIKSO (DST) and Tlhoafalo High School (located in Sannieshof in the North West Province) initiated an indigenous plant garden for community outreach programme (North West, South Africa);
  • Through consultations with stakeholders, SANBio IKS node developed a Bachelor of Indigenous Knowledge System and is awaiting necessary approvals (by academic institutions, SAQA, Knowledge holders, SADC ministerial committee);
  • SANBio trained more than 40 students at MSc and PhD level, in the region through the Node and Hub;
  • SANBio SADC Plant Genetic Resources Centre worked closely with the University of Zambia                                               Germplasm collection with the Zambian National Plant Genetic Resources Centre;
  • A cohort of Masters students graduated in 2012 through SANBio Bioinformatics Node hosted by University of Mauritius, among which there were three from Zimbabwe and Botswana and the rest from other African countries/continent;
  • With the assistance of local chiefs and agricultural extension officers, about 100 farming households benefited from farmer training/sensitizations on integrated livestock diseases management through the adaptation of Tephrosia vogelli, utilisation for ticks and tickborne diseases control.  The impact of this technology adaptation is now clearly showing.

Collaborations:

  • The SANBio IKS Node signed an MoU with the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform for Research, capacity building (training and skills) and technology development. The SANBio IKS Node in Collaboration with the DST and WIPO is rolling out a public awareness campaign on the WIPO documentation toolkit in 2009 at Moruleng Village in the North West Province;
  • The IKS node entered into an MoU with IKS sister organizations in South Africa (Indigenous Knowledge Systems of South Africa, The Freedom Park Trust, South African Chapter of the African Renaissance, African Renaissance Organization of Southern Africa) to partner in a process of mobilizing youth to participate in the promotion and protection of the heritage of South Africa by equipping them with necessary research skills through academic training. 6. The IKS centre held a public dialogue on African Traditional Medicine on 5 August 2013 and four days later hosted the “International Conference of the World’s indigenous People” at the Mafikeng Campus under the theme “Empowering and Enhancing Indigenous Peoples”;
  • The Centre entered into an MoU with Mbarara University of Technology for a collaboration on the promotion of IKS teaching, research and community outreach. Visits and IKS artifacts have been exchanged between the two institutions in 2011 2. The IKS Centre entered into a MoU with Hanseo University (HSU) of Korea for educational exchange in the cultural domain. This involved the exchange of staff and students to undertake community projects in each of the Countries. HSU assisted the Centre with the digitization of exhibition materials for IKS in this exchange. 3. The Centre collaborated with the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Co-operation (CTA) to host the Regional workshop on Promoting Indigenous Knowledge and Community Innovations in the Biosciences and Biotechnology in Southern Africa 18 -20 August 2010;
  • The node collaborated with the NEPAD office of Science & Technology to facilitate the appointment of a working group drawn from relevant expertise from all parts of the continent and beyond. The group would develop guidelines on intellectual property rights, traditional knowledge, plant genetic resources and access and benefit sharing. Prof PF Iya, a staff member of the IKS Centre, was one of the seven members of the working group. The guidelines were published by NEPAD. 2. The node in collaboration with researchers from the University of Botswana and the DST (South Africa) facilitated a workshop on “The „Mixed Cropping Systems of the !Xun and Khwe of Plaatfontein, Northern Cape in South Africa” This community consists of an indigenous community of Southern Africa. A DVD of the system was produced. 3. The Node in collaboration with the DST facilitated the attendance by a delegation of youths at the United Nations gathering of parties for the Rio+20 meeting. The team of selected Young Scientists from Malawi Tanzania, Uganda, Ghana and South Africa participated in debates on Climate Change as a side event.

Brochures

The Southern Africa Network for Biosciences (SANBio) is a platform to address and find means to resolve key bioscience concerns in health, nutrition, agriculture and environment in the Southern Africa.  SANBio, was established alongside four other networks under the African Biosciences...

Policy Report

The primary goal of the policy is to document the objectives, support actions and desired outputs to achieve the SADC Common Agenda. The SADC Common Agenda seeks to stimulate equitable and sustainable economic growth whilst promoting socio-economic development at national and regional level, and...

Contact:

Email: info@nepad.org

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